Tuesday, 5 September 2017

Accident Reveals Sensitive Information on Council Website

A consumer innocently browsing the internet accidentally stumbled across sensitive personal information left unsecured on a council website. This immediately raised concerns about how such data could be left out in the open, at the same time reminding organisations that no one is immune to breaches of data security. The revelation has also led to a substantial fine.

In a 31st August news release from the Information Commissioner's Office (ICO), it was revealed that Nottinghamshire County Council made protected data – including personal addresses, postcodes, and care requirements of the elderly and disabled – publicly available on an insecure site. The data was uncovered when a member of the public stumbled across it without the need to use a username and password to access the information.

ICO head of enforcement Steve Eckersley wrote in the news release:

"This was a serious and prolonged breach of the law. For no good reason, the council overlooked the need to put robust measures in place to protect people's personal information, despite having the financial and staffing resources available."

Eckersley went on to state that the actions by those responsible were both ‘unacceptable and inexcusable’ given how sensitive the data is. The data pertained primarily to individuals who received services based on the council's Homecare Allocation System (HCAS) first launched in 2011. The most egregious aspect of the mistake is the fact that the information had been left unprotected for five years by the time it was discovered in June 2016.

Nottinghamshire County Council has been fined £70,000 by the ICO for its carelessness. It is not yet known whether the 3,000 people whose data was left unprotected suffered any negative consequences as a result.

Proof of the Need for Due Diligence

As an organisation involved in the data centre industry, it is apparent to us that Nottinghamshire County Council was extremely careless in the handling of the HCAS data. It also seems rather strange that the mistake went unnoticed for so long given how much attention the ICO is supposed to be giving to matters of this sort. If anything, the story is further proof of the need for due diligence among those that store data as well government agencies tasked with protecting the general public.

Whenever any online system is created for the purposes of collecting, storing and utilising personal data, a tremendous amount of responsibility comes with that data. There is never an excuse to allow any sort of sensitive data to be freely available to the general public without need for protected access.

The ICO news release says that Nottinghamshire County Council has ‘offered no mitigation’ to this point. Let's hope that this changes sooner rather than later. The public deserves to know how the Council responded to the original revelation and what procedures are now in place to make sure such exposure never occurs again. If we cannot trust those entrusted to protect us, our data security problems are much bigger than we realise.

No comments:

Post a Comment