Thursday, 14 September 2017

TPS Violation Costs Company £85,000

It is against the law to call consumers whose phone numbers are registered with the Telephone Preference Service (TPS) without explicit consent from such consumers. Being found in violation could cost tens of thousands of pounds, as one Dartford-based telephone company recently found out.

According to an 11th September release from the Information Commissioner's Office (ICO), True Telecom Ltd made nuisance phone calls to consumers for more than two years despite many of those they called being on the TPS list. More astoundingly, the company continued making the calls even after being warned by the ICO to cease. The calls were placed between April 2015 and April 2017, and during that time, more than 200 complaints were registered with the ICO.

The company attempted to mislead consumers by concealing the number they were calling from and giving people the impression they were from the organisation known as BT Openreach. According to the ICO, True Telecom was unable to prove its innocence to investigators by providing evidence of consent.

The result of True Telecom's actions was an £85,000 fine and an official ICO enforcement notice informing True Telecom that it must stop making illegal phone calls immediately. Continuing the calls could result in court action down the road.

ICO Head of Enforcement Steve Eckersley said in his official statement that the rules pertaining to nuisance calls are clear and that his agency intends to enforce them. He went on to say:

"These calls are at best annoying and at worst downright distressing, and companies who pester the public in this way must understand they won't get away with it. The ICO will take action."

Respecting the Privacy of Consumers

Few would argue the fact that we live in a time when the information age has given way to the age of big data. Few would argue that we need rules and regulations in place to protect the privacy of consumers. The rules surrounding nuisance phone calls certainly apply. They were put in place to prevent companies from pressing consumers with repeated, unwanted phone calls.

It is all well and good that True Telecom has been investigated and fined for their illegal activity. But the ICO's report begs the question of how this company got the contact information they used to make the calls. If that information was supplied directly by the consumers themselves as a result of doing business with True Telecom, that's one thing. But, if the information was sold to them by another organisation, we are talking an entirely different matter.

Could it be that it's time to start enacting rules that prevent companies from selling personal information? If we are truly trying to protect the privacy and security of consumers, why on earth do we allow personal information to be packaged and sold? It makes no sense. As long as we do nothing about this loophole, consumers will continue to be victimised by companies who care nothing about their privacy and security.

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